Actias luna in Florida

DID YOU KNOW THERE IS A TYPE OF MOTH THAT HAS NO MOUTH AND DIES IN A WEEK FROM STARVATION?

As with all Saturniidae, the adults do not eat or have mouths.[4] They emerge as adults solely to mate, and as such, only live approximately one week.

Actias luna in Florida

DID YOU KNOW THERE IS A TYPE OF MOTH THAT HAS NO MOUTH AND DIES IN A WEEK FROM STARVATION?

As with all Saturniidae, the adults do not eat or have mouths.[4] They emerge as adults solely to mate, and as such, only live approximately one week.


awwww-cute:

This is Bailey. Ever since I taught him to balance a treat on his nose, he lets me stack whatever I want on his face

awwww-cute:

This is Bailey. Ever since I taught him to balance a treat on his nose, he lets me stack whatever I want on his face

(via pleatedjeans)


fireandshellamari:

A Very Merry Hallow!

And a Happy New ‘Ween.

(via pleatedjeans)




YOUR WHOLE LIFE CAN CHANGE IF YOU DECIDE TO STOP SULKING.

YOUR WHOLE LIFE CAN CHANGE IF YOU DECIDE TO STOP SULKING.


WHAT MAKES HIPPO’S MILK PINK ??You must have heard in most of the Fact Sites that Hippo’s milk is Pink, but ever wondered why ?
Well, here’s the answer :
1- Hippopotamuses have adapted to utilize two unique acid secretions in their skin.2- The first is called "hipposudoric acid" and the second is called "norhipposudoric acid".
3- Since these are strong acids, they deter the growth of bacteria on the skin. 

4- In addition, hipposudoric acid is colored bright red while norhipposudoric acid is colored bright orange. 

5- The combination of these two acids provides hippopotamuses with a sunscreen effect because these colors absorb dangerous, cell-destroying ultraviolet light. 
6- Hippopotamus milk is most likely pink due to the combination of these acidic secretions with off-white milk (red + white = pink).

WHAT MAKES HIPPO’S MILK PINK ??

You must have heard in most of the Fact Sites that Hippo’s milk is Pink, but ever wondered why ?

Well, here’s the answer :

1- 
Hippopotamuses have adapted to utilize two unique acid secretions in their skin.

2- The first is called "hipposudoric acid" and the second is called "norhipposudoric acid".

3- Since these are strong acids, they deter the growth of bacteria on the skin. 
4- In addition, hipposudoric acid is colored bright red while norhipposudoric acid is colored bright orange. 
5- The combination of these two acids provides hippopotamuses with a sunscreen effect because these colors absorb dangerous, cell-destroying ultraviolet light. 

6- Hippopotamus milk is most likely pink due to the combination of these acidic secretions with off-white milk (red + white = pink).




 

a zoo of dogs dressed up as other animals

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(Source: hiddentheirs)


Uveitis is swelling and irritation of the uvea, the middle layer of the eye. The uvea provides most of the blood supply to the retina.

Leptospirosis can have different clinical manifestations including abortion, still birth, systemic disease with hepatic or renal dysfunction, and equine recurrent uveitis (ERU). ERU is the most frequently encountered clinical manifestation.


Equine recurrent uveitis is the most common cause of vision impairment and blindness in horses. The pathogenesis of leptospira-associated ERU involves direct bacterial effects and immune-mediated responses. Clinical signs vary between the acute and chronic phases of the disease and progress over time. The diagnosis of leptospira-associated ERU can be difficult and usually requires a combination of diagnostic tests. Medical and surgical treatments have been described with varying outcomes. The prognosis for sight is usually poor, although core vitrectomy may improve the outcome. Avoidance of leptospiral exposure of horses is the only reliable prevention of leptospira-associated disease.

Uveitis is swelling and irritation of the uvea, the middle layer of the eye. The uvea provides most of the blood supply to the retina.

Leptospirosis can have different clinical manifestations including abortion, still birth, systemic disease with hepatic or renal dysfunction, and equine recurrent uveitis (ERU). ERU is the most frequently encountered clinical manifestation.

Equine recurrent uveitis is the most common cause of vision impairment and blindness in horses. The pathogenesis of leptospira-associated ERU involves direct bacterial effects and immune-mediated responses. Clinical signs vary between the acute and chronic phases of the disease and progress over time. The diagnosis of leptospira-associated ERU can be difficult and usually requires a combination of diagnostic tests. Medical and surgical treatments have been described with varying outcomes. The prognosis for sight is usually poor, although core vitrectomy may improve the outcome. Avoidance of leptospiral exposure of horses is the only reliable prevention of leptospira-associated disease.





NIGHTNIGHT by DEDDY